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Religious Beliefs


Christian Science

Christian Science, as discovered by Mary Baker Eddy, refers to the universal, practical system of spiritual, prayer-based healing, available and accessible to everyone.

A means of spiritual care through which individuals have found better emotional and physical health, answers to life’s deepest issues and progress on their spiritual journeys. Healthcare decisions are always a matter of individual choice.

The Church of Christ, Scientist, often known as the Christian Science church, is a denomination that arose in New England in the late nineteenth century. It has about 2,000 branches (local churches) in over 70 countries, with The First Church of Christ, Scientist in Boston, Massachusetts being the denomination's headquarters.

The First Church of Christ, Scientist, is widely known for its publications, especially the Christian Science Monitor, a daily newspaper published internationally in print and on the Internet. Some consider the Church to be controversial due to its emphasis on healing through prayer when others might choose modern medicine. There have also been periodic tensions with other Christian denominations who reject the idea that Christian Science is a Christian denomination because of what some consider to be unorthodox tenets.