Home Religious Beliefs

Religious Beliefs

Navigation

Religious Glossary

Religious Logos

Religious Software

Religious Articles

Discount Religious Gifts



Religions

Cherokee Indian Religion
Inca Religion
Baptist Religion
Amish Religion
Lutheran Religion
Mormon Religion
Chinese Religion
Islamic Religion
Hindu Religion
Muslim Religion
Catholic Religion
Sikh Religion
Buddhist Religion
Church of Christ Science
Jehovah Witness
Kaballah Religion
Episcopal Religion
Presbyterian Religion
Taoism Religion
Protestant Religion
Quaker Religion


Spirtiuality

Buddhism
Christianity
Hinduism
Islam
Judaism
Bible


Expert Q&A

Heaven and Hell
Holistic Meditation
How to Meditate
Meditation
Faith and Culture Combine

Religious Gifts

Religious Gifts

Buddhism Gifts

Christian Gifts

Jewish Gifts
Islamic Gifts

 

Religious Beliefs


Religious Glossary - common terms used related to Religion

Liturgy - Meaning "the work of the people," a liturgy comprises a prescribed religious ceremony, according to the traditions of a particular religion; it may refer to, or include, an elaborate formal ritual (such as the Catholic Mass), a daily activity such as the Muslim Salats, or attendance to Quaker Meeting. (wikipedia)

The Eucharistic Service of the Church, usually called the Divine Liturgy. The Liturgy most often used is the Liturgy of Saint John Chrysostom. The Liturgy of Saint Basil the Great is used ten times a year, notably on the five Sundays of Great Lent.

Literally, the public work of the people , whereby we come together to describe our nature as faithful people. We use the word to describe the drama and form of the Holy Eucharist.

An order of service featuring written down prayers, praises, and scripture taken from the worship forms of ancient Christians and Anglicans. We believe that this form offers a security and soundness of doctrine not subject to the whims of the celebrant in charge of the service. It contains much scripture directly quoted and paraphrased; and provides a depth to our worship that is not often found in more informal and spontaneous worship.